Ricepaper Magazine » Ricepaper Magazine | Ricepaper Magazine http://ricepapermagazine.ca Asian Canadian Arts and Culture Tue, 31 Mar 2015 03:23:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 Ricepaper Magazine Issue 20.1 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/ricepaper-magazine-issue-20-1/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/ricepaper-magazine-issue-20-1/#comments Tue, 24 Mar 2015 03:21:59 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10738 Spring is here and so is Ricepaper’s latest issue. We are celebrating our 20th volume by sharing our love for all our readers, friends, and community members.

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In this issue, you’ll find a delightful variety of prose, poetry, and graphica … more »

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Spring is here and so is Ricepaper’s latest issue. We are celebrating our 20th volume by sharing our love for all our readers, friends, and community members.

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In this issue, you’ll find a delightful variety of prose, poetry, and graphica focusing on the topic of love. Naoko Kumagai’s Koshien delves into the world of baseball and passion, while Aaron Chan’s Cold War deals with the complications of same sex relationships. Also, issue 20.1 features poetry from Elaine Woo, Evelyn Lau, Jenny Heijum Wills, Leanne Dunic, and Changming Yuan. Ricepaper Magazine’s spring issue includes a profile of Canada Reads winner Kim Thúy by Elliot Chan and a graphic profile of illustrator Michael Cho by Taylor Brown-Evans.

We at Ricepaper Magazine felt as though an activism issue was long overdue, but here it is now, and we couldn’t be more proud of the result. Take a look and see for yourself!

Buy your copy today.

Or better off, subscribe!

 

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Call for Submissions: Roots Issue (20.3-Fall 2015) http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/call-for-submissions-roots-issue-20-3-fall-2015/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/call-for-submissions-roots-issue-20-3-fall-2015/#comments Wed, 18 Mar 2015 04:08:58 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10724 What are your roots?

In partnership with the Pacific Canada Heritage Centre – Museum of Migration Society, Ricepaper Magazine is creating a special issue devoted to the concept of roots, to be published Fall 2015. Canada is a country with … more »

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What are your roots?

In partnership with the Pacific Canada Heritage Centre – Museum of Migration Society, Ricepaper Magazine is creating a special issue devoted to the concept of roots, to be published Fall 2015. Canada is a country with roots that extend over the Pacific ocean as well as throughout the country, and we are looking for stories by those who wish to explore the stories behind these roots. Subjects can include immigrant stories, identity transformation upon crossing cultural and geographical boundaries, tracing roots/being uprooted/putting down new roots, having new adventures in different countries, inter-generational negotiation and reconciliation, etc. Be creative! Please include a brief biographical note of approximately fifty (50) words along with your submission.

We are looking for short stories, creative non-fiction, poetry, drama excerpts, and manga/comics with themes pertinent to roots or migration stories. We accept writing from authors of all cultural backgrounds, however, the focus of the issue concentrates on roots from across the Pacific, including East Asian, Southeast Asian, and South Asian writers.

Fiction, creative non-fiction, drama and graphic novel excerpts should be approximately 6,000 words in length, and no more than 2 pieces per submission,

Poetry submissions can contain up to 7 poems,

Submit online at Submittable.

Hard copies can be mailed to

Ricepaper magazine
PO Box 74174 Hillcrest RPO
Vancouver, BC
V5V 5C8

 

Please note that Ricepaper makes acceptances on a rolling basis, therefore early submissions are highly encouraged.

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10 Things to Remember when Visiting your Home Country http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/10-things-to-remember-when-visiting-your-home-country/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/10-things-to-remember-when-visiting-your-home-country/#comments Tue, 17 Mar 2015 18:30:58 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10712 I came to Canada four and a half years ago to study, a few months after my eighteenth birthday. It’s an age where my views of the world and my surroundings have yet to develop like it would in university. … more »

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I came to Canada four and a half years ago to study, a few months after my eighteenth birthday. It’s an age where my views of the world and my surroundings have yet to develop like it would in university. You could say that I was, well, innocent. I was leaving the place where I grew up, so naturally I was going to miss it soon and often.

northern hemisphere of the globe

I visited my home country many times after coming to Canada. Returning home became a vacation, and no matter how costly, it’s one of the best vacations one can take and let me tell you — it’s worth it. Nevertheless, venturing back to a place that is completely different to where you are currently living, even if it was the place where you spent your childhood, can be overwhelming. Here are the things to do and remember when visiting your home country:

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  1. Plan ahead. Book your tickets at least two months before your departure date. Buses, trains, and airplanes are usually very busy during the holiday season, and you don’t want to miss out on tickets. If you’re traveling by air, I heard that the cheapest time to buy a plane ticket is 54 days before the flight.

  2. Keep in touch with news and trends at home. Living in another country doesn’t mean that you can be out of touch with what’s going on where your family and friends reside. I always found it beneficial to keep in touch with what’s new at home; somehow, it makes me feel more connected with my country, friends, and family. It’s also a way to let them know that you still care about where you come from.

  3. Ask your friends and family if they need anything from you abroad, and bring gifts. They don’t have to be anything big or expensive, but tokens of appreciations let your friends and family know that, despite the distance, they are still close to your heart.

  4. Spend at least three weeks at home. Give yourself a few days to rest at home after arriving, especially if it’s a long flight. Get use to the new timezone (if that’s an issue) so you could spend as much quality time as possible with your friends and family.note book with inspiration

  5. Make plans to meet with friends and family. After moving to Canada, I realized how much an effort relationships were; not just with your significant other, but with your friends and family as well. Make sure to plan your schedule so you could see everyone you want to meet in the short time that you’re home, but don’t forget to also prioritize and spend time with those who matter most.

  6. Brace yourself for hurtful or inappropriate comments from relatives. In Indonesia, it’s normal to comment on someone’s physical appearance after not seeing each other for a while. I had to hear a lot of “wow, you’re fat now” or “you became bloated somehow!” which was not easy anymore to hear; I became used to Canadian social norms and have forgotten mine. If this happens to you, take a deep breath and remember that your relatives show their love to you in their own cultural ways.

  7. Expect a culture shock in your own home country, remember that you might have changed since the last time you came home, and perhaps so did your friends and family. Your habits might have changed, or your perspectives on aspects of life did. Remember not to impose your new beliefs or habits, if you have any, on people at home, and respect those of your loved ones. Like traveling to countries you’ve never visited before, visiting your home country may also open your mind and introduce you to a new culture, while providing you with opportunities to grow to be a better person. Sure, there’s likely some disconnect between your life and those of your friends and family, but as long as you remain respectful, you’ll get through it wonderfully.

  8. Indulge in food and other things you can’t find abroad. Whenever I go home, I would go eat my favourite Indonesian street foods or my grandma’s cooking. I would also rejoice in the sunny, tropical weather! One of the best things about going back to your home country is, you’re taking a vacation in a familiar and loved place (well, if you do love it, that is!)

  9. Find and learn new things to love about your home country. It’s easy to focus on the negative aspects of my home country, especially since it is starkly different from Canada, where I have gotten so used to live in. Finding new things to love is more challenging, but also rewarding. You get to keep that connection with your own culture, heritage and tradition, and it may help you feel more connected with people at home, too.

  10. Tell your friends and family you love them. Never forget this point. Let them know that despite the distance between you all, you always hold them close to your heart.

If you follow all of the above steps, your visit at home will likely be more peaceful, relaxed and eventful. Traveling to other countries is fun, but traveling to your home country is a different happiness altogether!

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Book Review – The Shadow Hero http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/book-review-the-shadow-hero/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/book-review-the-shadow-hero/#comments Wed, 11 Mar 2015 04:07:04 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10698 UnknownThe Shadow Hero

By Gene Luen Yang & Sonny Liew
First Second (July 2014)
176 Pages, $17.99 (Paperback)
Reviewed by Kathryn Gwun-Yeen Lennon

 

On October 27, the day before the Toronto municipal elections, the Toronto Sun ran an editorial … more »

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UnknownThe Shadow Hero

By Gene Luen Yang & Sonny Liew
First Second (July 2014)
176 Pages, $17.99 (Paperback)
Reviewed by Kathryn Gwun-Yeen Lennon

 

On October 27, the day before the Toronto municipal elections, the Toronto Sun ran an editorial cartoon of Mayoral Candidate Olivia Chow. She is depicted with slanted eyes and big glasses, in a Mao suit, standing on Jack Layton’s coattails, on a skateboard. Dating back to the late 1800s, political cartoons have been used to stir up racist, anti-Chinese and Orientalist sentiments in Canadian and American newspapers. Seeing contemporary representations of this makes me feel angry and powerless. It is a reminder that some of us will always be “others”, and makes me wish I had a little more heroism in my life…

Cue The Shadow Hero to the rescue! The award-winning Gene Luen Yang and Sonny Liew team up to give us the origin story of a shamelessly Chinese American superhero.

The Shadow Hero is a fun, fast-paced, and colourful graphic novel, with humour that resonates, and illustrations that empower. Like any good origin myth, it’s about transformation. It’s about the universal awkwardness of being different and just wanting to fit in, layered over the complexities that come with migration and systemic racism, and moving between languages and cultures.

Yang and Liew are masters of subtext. The storytelling is in the details. They deftly evoke the sense of navigating between worlds that comes with the immigrant experience. Literally. Each chapter opens with a portion of a map. They make the story accessible to both those with “inside” cultural knowledge, and those without, by balancing Chinese/Chinatown/Chinese American cultural references with universal themes. Yang and Liew draw on the world of Chinese mythology and spirits—beginning with a council of a dragon, phoenix, tiger and tortoise—all shadowy figures. These spirits come to represent ties to heritage and cultural values that lie across the ocean. The homage Liew pays to the streetscapes, signage, store fronts, and shop interiors of Chinatown is lovely. He even illustrates a floor plan of a typical Chinatown mixed use home and store unit. If you can read Chinese, you’ll enjoy deciphering some of the signage throughout.

Given that some of the most hurtful mythology created around Asian Americans was done through caricature and political cartoons, it is fitting that Yang and Liew turn this medium around, in an American context, to “fight for justice”. They beautifully illustrate the code switching, and the living between two worlds that comes from the immigrant experience. They deftly weave in references to the racist stereotypes of the time, without having them steal the show. And they don’t have to, because in The Shadow Hero, the show is stolen by a hero that gives us a reflection of ourselves.

By equating immigrant identity with a superhero identity, and giving that superhero a character that we can relate to, The Shadow Hero issues a call to all the shadow heroes among you, all you non-white children of immigrants: You too can grow up to be superheroes!


 

This review was featured in issue 19.4

Keep up to date with newly released fiction, non-fiction, poetry, graphic novels, and children’s books. Subscribe NOW to Ricepaper Magazine. 

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Translation: The purest form of engagement with a text? http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/translation-the-purest-form-of-engagement-with-a-text/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/translation-the-purest-form-of-engagement-with-a-text/#comments Sat, 07 Mar 2015 04:28:43 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10701 Most of us at Ricepaper speak more than one language. Growing up 8,000 miles away from Vancouver, I too speak more than one language. Indonesian is my native tongue, with English as my second language.

In recent years I’m so … more »

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Most of us at Ricepaper speak more than one language. Growing up 8,000 miles away from Vancouver, I too speak more than one language. Indonesian is my native tongue, with English as my second language.

In recent years I’m so used to speaking, thinking, and even dreaming in English that the longer I am in Vancouver the harder it is for me to talk in Indonesian about my daily life. When I Skype my parents at home, it’s often difficult for me to tell them what I do at work or what my opinions are on a political matter, because I think and process my thoughts in a different language. So when I try to explain them something in Indonesian, I have to translate my thoughts from English.

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My experience shows that translation can be tricky even on the most basic level. How complex and difficult is it to translate a deeper thought, a body of work, a piece of prose or a poem? I may be able to speak both Indonesian and English, but can I translate a literary piece from one language to another? I don’t think it’s that easy.

Translated books usually have a translator’s note in the first few pages. Often, the translator has to explain to the readers their choices of words, phrasing, or decisions to translate certain words in the footnotes instead of directly doing that in-text. After reading so many of these notes, I can see how translators take a lot of pride of their work—which they should, because it’s not an easy feat—and how it’s not just a matter of picking up the dictionary and using the first meaning you find to replace the word you want to translate. A good translator understands not only the surface, but also the deeper meaning.

Translating prose or a poem, I think, is similar to analyzing texts like the way students do in university. You have to take a small part of the text one by one, to go deeper, fleshing out the meaning the author intended and recreating the same feeling and atmosphere that are invoked by the original text. It is time-consuming. A process has to be revisited many times for the translator to properly dig into the work. If the translator has no way of meeting and working with the author personally, he or she has to immersed themselves completely in the work, as to translate it as perfectly as possible.

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Translation, however, can be quite a controversial topic. Vladimir Nabokov argued that a translator has to possess an equal amount of talent to the original author. This is a tricky requirement, in my opinion, because it can undermine a translator’s motivation and discourages many to work hard in translating works they are passionate about. Nabokov and his longtime friend Edmund Wilson even broke their friendship over the issue of translation, a contested concept that it is.

Ricepaper has published a few translated works in our recent issues, such as Josh Stenberg’s translation of Scholar Dong and Madam Li by Wang Renjie and Sally Ito’s translation of Sumo and Tennis by Toshiro Saito.

Would you like to see more translated work in Ricepaper? What are your thoughts of translating literary works? Let us know in the comment section below.

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Book Review – Hana Hashimoto, Sixth Violin http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/book-review-hana-hashimoto-sixth-violin/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/book-review-hana-hashimoto-sixth-violin/#comments Thu, 05 Mar 2015 20:00:42 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10693 Hana HashimotoHANA HASHIMOTO, SIXTH VIOLIN
BY CHIERI UEGAKI & ILLUSTRATED BY QIN LENG
KIDS CAN PRESS (AUGUST 2014)
32 PAGES, $18.95 (HARDCOVER)
REVIEWED BY MIRANDA MENG

 

Hana Hashimoto, Sixth Violin is a story about courage and intergenerational love expressed at … more »

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Hana HashimotoHANA HASHIMOTO, SIXTH VIOLIN
BY CHIERI UEGAKI & ILLUSTRATED BY QIN LENG
KIDS CAN PRESS (AUGUST 2014)
32 PAGES, $18.95 (HARDCOVER)
REVIEWED BY MIRANDA MENG

 

Hana Hashimoto, Sixth Violin is a story about courage and intergenerational love expressed at a young age. Hana Hashimoto is a little girl who challenges herself to play violin at the school talent show, after a brief encounter with violin while visiting her Ojiichan (grandfather) in Japan.

Hana’s brothers tease her because she has only been to three violin classes, so they feel there is no way she will perform well on the stage. Hana, however, shows determination and starts practicing in front of any audience she can find: her brothers, her parents, Jojo the dog, and—of course—a photo of her inspiration, Ojiichan.

Like any other girl growing up with anxiety and doubt in herself, Hana’s heart starts pounding when she finally stands in the spotlight on stage. Instead of the lustrous and eloquent timbre everyone’s expecting, Hana surprises the audience with her own style of violin, making the playful sounds of “lowing cows,” “squeaking mice,” and “croaking frogs” on the violin. The story ends with a bittersweet feeling, as Hana plays an old melody and wishes her grandfather could hear across the Pacific Ocean.

Simple but surprising, the message of persistence and self-determination in Hana Hashimoto is a nod to the spirit of Confucius. At the same time, author Chieri Uegaki shows young readers that real courage can also mean breaking social norms and finding your own ways to define success.

The intergenerational relationship between Hana and her grandfather in this book is an important and transcendent theme. To many, grandparents are very special people; they are often so far, yet so close, given the age, cultural, and even geographic gaps between the intergenerational family members. This idea touches my own heart, as I was raised by my a-po (grandma) as a child living in China.

The lyrical storytelling in Hana Hashimoto, Sixth Violin is complemented by Qin Leung’s beautiful illustrations on glossy paper, which help to unfold the story in a gentle and charming manner. Her watercolour-style paintings add a hint of Miyazaki, where love, courage, and nostalgia are always the central theme.

With positive messages about the power of self determination and the bonds of intergenerational family expressed in a beautifully illustrated, sweet story, Chieri Uegaki and Qin Leng’s Hana Hashimoto, Sixth Violin is a delightful read for both children and adults.


 

This review was featured in issue 19.3

Keep up to date with newly released fiction, non-fiction, poetry, graphic novels, and children’s books. Subscribe NOW to Ricepaper Magazine. 

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Book Review – Cycling With The Dragon http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/02/book-review-cycling-with-the-dragon/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/02/book-review-cycling-with-the-dragon/#comments Thu, 26 Feb 2015 20:00:46 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10690  

0889713014CYCLING WITH THE DRAGON

BY ELAINE WOO
NIGHTWOOD EDITIONS (SEPTEMBER 2014)
96 PAGES, $18.95 (PAPERBACK)

REVIEWED BY YILIN WANG

 

Cycling with the Dragon, the debut poetry collection by Chinese-Canadian author Elaine Woo, opens with a poem that … more »

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0889713014CYCLING WITH THE DRAGON

BY ELAINE WOO
NIGHTWOOD EDITIONS (SEPTEMBER 2014)
96 PAGES, $18.95 (PAPERBACK)

REVIEWED BY YILIN WANG

 

Cycling with the Dragon, the debut poetry collection by Chinese-Canadian author Elaine Woo, opens with a poem that links childbirth with the creative process. Woo then goes on to present characters who are often marginalized figures, such as children, women, racial minorities, or impoverished individuals who dwell at the fringe of society. While the characters are each experiencing distinct stages of their lives—childhood, youth, marriage, childbirth, grieving, or aging—all their experiences are both personal and universal.

Woo skilfully mingles descriptions of marginalized characters with cultural observations and haunting images of nature, suggesting that individuals are inseparable from their surrounding cultural and physical environment. Her characters struggle with others’ misunderstanding, particularly racial or social stereotypes, like the belief that Chinese people eat dogs or the ignorant question “why are so many criminals Asian?”. Trapped by challenges and circumstance, they turn to literature and nature for strength and comfort. In this way, Woo’s poems extend far beyond the individual and cultural, morphing into meta-poems that showcase the power of language to heal and inspire.

Woo’s style is highly evocative and experimental. While some of her works are conventional lyric or narrative poems, she often breaks new ground by playing with formal elements like shape, visual appearance, line length, and rhythm. “My Dessert” takes on a circular appearance, “Peace on Earth: Cacophony” consists of quotes surrounded by speech boxes, and the crescent-shaped “Arc” combines descriptions with the stage instructions of a screenplay. Her avant-garde approach could be hard to grasp at first glance, but provides an excellent framework for portraying minority figures whose viewpoints deviate from the mainstream culture and often face judgment or misunderstanding. Woo is not afraid to take risks, to push the boundaries of form, and to choose the unique over the familiar.

With her background as a Chinese-Canadian poet, Woo depicts minority experiences and challenges with raw and heartfelt emotion. Her ability to play with diction, imagery, and form allows her to bring a distinct voice to explore identity, gender, family relations, racism, nature, and the creative process. Like a skilled conductor, she has put together a well-orchestrated symphony: a myriad of underrepresented voices from different backgrounds, interrupted by clashes between cultures, accompanied by pastoral scenes of nature, and punctuated by odes to books and stories. And like a mesmerizing song, her book is one to be savoured slowly, again and again, creating a deeper impression with each re-reading.


This review was featured in issue 19.3

Keep up to date with newly released fiction, non-fiction, poetry, graphic novels, and children’s books. Subscribe NOW to Ricepaper Magazine. 

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The Asian Index – Dragon Ball, Expo 86, and Nintendo – 19.3 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/02/the-asian-index-dragon-ball-expo-86-and-nintendo-19-3/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/02/the-asian-index-dragon-ball-expo-86-and-nintendo-19-3/#comments Wed, 25 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10687 Dragon Ball

The year Dragon Ball was originally serialized – 1984
The year MuchMusic first aired – 1984

The year the first Dragon Ball Z TV special aired – 1990
The year the first MuchMusic Video Music Awards aired – … more »

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Dragon Ball

The year Dragon Ball was originally serialized – 1984
The year MuchMusic first aired – 1984

The year the first Dragon Ball Z TV special aired – 1990
The year the first MuchMusic Video Music Awards aired – 1990

The number MuchMusic affiliated channel – 16
The number of Dragon Ball Z films – 16

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Expo 86

The year the Nintendo Famicom was released – 1983
The year construction started on Expo 86 – 1983

The year The Legend of Zelda was first released – 1986
The year of The World Expo in Vancouver – 1986

The number of copies sold of The Legend of Zelda series – 67,000,000
The size of the Main Expo site – 670,000 m3

Nintendo 

The year Nintendo Famicom became a best selling video game console in Japan – 1984
The year the Edmonton Oilers won their first Stanley Cup – 1984

The year Nintendo Entertainment System was released in North America – 1985
The year Wayne Gretzky broke his points record – 1985

The year Nintendo Game Boy was first conceived – 1988
The year Wayne Gretzky was traded to the LA Kings – 1988

The year Yoshi was debuted in Super Mario World - 1990
The year the Edmonton Oilers won their last Stanley Cup – 1990

 


Want to read more Asian Indexes by Kristin Cheung?

Subscribe to Ricepaper Magazine!

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The Bond of Cities: Everything You Need To Know About Sister Cities http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/02/the-bond-of-cities-everything-you-need-to-know-about-sister-cities/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/02/the-bond-of-cities-everything-you-need-to-know-about-sister-cities/#comments Tue, 17 Feb 2015 10:00:58 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10675 By Eric Wilkins 

Odessa, Ukraine; Yokohama, Japan; Edinburgh, Scotland; Guangzhou, China; and Los Angeles, United States. Upon first glance, seemingly the only commonality shared amongst these cities is the utter randomness with which they have been mentioned. However, despite each … more »

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By Eric Wilkins 

Odessa, Ukraine; Yokohama, Japan; Edinburgh, Scotland; Guangzhou, China; and Los Angeles, United States. Upon first glance, seemingly the only commonality shared amongst these cities is the utter randomness with which they have been mentioned. However, despite each appearing to be completely unique, they all share one bond: they’re sister cities of Vancouver.

SisterCities

Sister cities. What does that even mean? These cities neither stay up on the phone all night with each other nor borrow one another’s favourite outfits. As with actual family members, the relationship can be a bit more than that. Cities can designate each other as such for any number of reasons, whether they simply share the same name—as is the case with Toledo, Spain and Toledo, Ohio—have a number of similarities, are bound by historical events, or share interests and goals. There is no set definition or qualifier.

 

The concept of sister cities, also known as twin towns, is not a new one, with records indicating that the first instance of them occurring was in 1836 between Paderborn, Germany, and Le Mans, France (though only officially since 1967). Vancouver entered its first sister city partnership in 1944 with Odessa in a relationship born out of the hardships of war.

 

And while the cultural benefits are often quality results by themselves, an increasing trend has seen sister cities become so for economic reasons. Continuing with the theme of our own city, Vancouver and Guangzhou are two such cities to have strengthened their bond in recent years. In 2013, the two established a five-year agreement between Tourism Vancouver and Tourism Guangzhou, under which, according to Metro, they will “share research, compare best practices and provide mutual support for continued tourism efforts.” The agreement came about as a result of a large Vancouver delegation visiting some prestigious company in Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, and of course, in no small part due to their relationship, Guangzhou. With China accounting for a significant portion of Vancouver’s tourism industry, some might suggest that such partnerships are elementary, but in a highly competitive economic climate, sometimes it just takes a little bit to make one preferable over another.

 

With cities being bound by the past, culture, economic reasons, and name alone, sister cities are aptly named as such. Involvement can be as much or as little as the two parties desire, but, just as with family, the two will always share a relationship for better or for worse.

 

 

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Ricepaper Second Serving: Fumie von Dehn, fashion designer http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/02/ricepaper-second-serving-fumie-von-dehn/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/02/ricepaper-second-serving-fumie-von-dehn/#comments Mon, 16 Feb 2015 18:00:04 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10641 RP SS

For two decades, Ricepaper Magazine published profiles, Q&A, and interviews from some of the most prominent artists, scribes, and influencers in the Asian Canadian community. The Ricepaper Second Serving series offer readers a chance to look back at our history more »

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RP SS

For two decades, Ricepaper Magazine published profiles, Q&A, and interviews from some of the most prominent artists, scribes, and influencers in the Asian Canadian community. The Ricepaper Second Serving series offer readers a chance to look back at our history and remember some thought-provking words spoken and written by those who helped change it.

I love the material and I want more people to know more about vintage silk. If people buy a kimono it’s hard to wear and then they usually end up being stored inside a chest of drawers. I want to reuse them [the kimono] so the silk can come alive again. – Fumie von Dehn

Fumie von Dehn

“For the Love of Silk: The Creative Work of Fumie von Dehn” by Amy Chow from issue 14.4. Read the whole profile here. 

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