Ricepaper Magazine » Ricepaper Magazine | Ricepaper Magazine http://ricepapermagazine.ca Asian Canadian Arts and Culture Sat, 29 Aug 2015 02:02:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 LiterASIAN 2015 Festival is here! October 8-11 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/08/literasian-2015-festival-is-here-october-8-11/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/08/literasian-2015-festival-is-here-october-8-11/#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 16:33:06 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10864 The Vancouver Asian Canadian Writers’ Workshop (ACWW) is pleased to announce the countdown to its much anticipated celebration of LiterASIAN 2015: A Festival of Pacific Rim Asian Canadian Writing from October 8th to 11th, 2015 in Vancouver, BC. As a … more »

]]>
The Vancouver Asian Canadian Writers’ Workshop (ACWW) is pleased to announce the countdown to its much anticipated celebration of LiterASIAN 2015: A Festival of Pacific Rim Asian Canadian Writing from October 8th to 11th, 2015 in Vancouver, BC. As a non-profit organization with a mandate to promote awareness of Asian Canadian literature, history, and culture, ACWW provide a supportive and culturally sensitive environment for members from a common Pacific Rim Asian Canadian heritage.

Visit the website to register!


tumblr_inline_ntasalJHOL1qmcer1_540


The Vancouver Asian Canadian Writers’ Workshop (ACWW) is pleased to announce the countdown to its much anticipated celebration of LiterASIAN 2015: A Festival of Pacific Rim Asian Canadian Writing from October 8th to 11th, 2015 in Vancouver, BC. As a non-profit organization with a mandate to promote awareness of Asian Canadian literature, history, and culture, ACWW provide a supportive and culturally sensitive environment for members from a common Pacific Rim Asian Canadian heritage.

Visit the website to register!

]]>
http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/08/literasian-2015-festival-is-here-october-8-11/feed/ 0
Ricepaper Summer Party – July 30 Thursday http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/07/ricepaper-summer-party-july-30-thursday/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/07/ricepaper-summer-party-july-30-thursday/#comments Sun, 19 Jul 2015 05:11:01 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10840 Come chill with us this summer! Join Ricepaper editors, staff and volunteers to celebrate our summer issue!

We’ll have pretty yummy readings by Ricepaper contributors, special artisan bubble tea, brain-freezing trivia questions inspired by our popular Asian Index feature, and … more »

]]>
Come chill with us this summer! Join Ricepaper editors, staff and volunteers to celebrate our summer issue!

We’ll have pretty yummy readings by Ricepaper contributors, special artisan bubble tea, brain-freezing trivia questions inspired by our popular Asian Index feature, and plenty of prizes.

Your favourite Asian Canadian writers will be reading:

  • Carolyn Nakagawa
  • Jessica Tremblay
  • Isaac Yuen
  • Leanne Dunic
  • Aaron Chan

Thursday July 30th, 2015
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Centre A – 229 East Georgia St. 

Come connect with the Asian Canadian literary community, hear the readings, win prizes, read some Ricepaper, and enjoy some delicious drinks!

RSVP HERE!

RP summer party

 

]]>
http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/07/ricepaper-summer-party-july-30-thursday/feed/ 0
Ricepaper Secret ingredient Flash Fiction Writing Contest http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/07/secret-ingredient-flash-fiction-writing-contest/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/07/secret-ingredient-flash-fiction-writing-contest/#comments Sat, 04 Jul 2015 16:26:55 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10831 Ricepaper is holding our first writing contest to celebrate our twenty years! We want to celebrate with you and some tasty ramen, so we’re holding a flash fiction writing contest with a special treat —- include the world ‘ramen’. Win … more »

]]>
Ricepaper is holding our first writing contest to celebrate our twenty years! We want to celebrate with you and some tasty ramen, so we’re holding a flash fiction writing contest with a special treat —- include the world ‘ramen’. Win cash prizes and a chance to be published in your favourite Asian Canadian magazine (that’s us)!

Ricepaper Secret ingredient Flash Fiction Writing Contest

What is it?

Ricepaper’s Annual Secret Ingredient Fiction Contest is a 500-words-max flash fiction contest. The piece of work must include the mystery ingredient selected by Ricepaper’s editorial staff.

What’s the secret ingredient topic? 

RAMEN

When is the deadline? 

***Extended to July 15, 2015***

Is there a submission fee? 

Yes, $25.

You also get a 1 year subscription upon entry. If you are already a subscriber, you can gift your contest subscription forward, or extend by a year.

Where do I submit? 

Submit your story online through Submittable.

What are the prizes? 

FIRST PLACE: $250, publication in issue 20.4 winter 2015, online publication, contest winner announcement at and free registration for the 2015 literAsian Festival.*

SECOND PLACE: Asian Canadian literary prize pack and online publication.

THIRD PLACE: Online publication.

Do I have to identify as Asian to participate? 

No, everyone can enter. Anybody can win!

*Travel and lodging costs not included.

]]>
http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/07/secret-ingredient-flash-fiction-writing-contest/feed/ 0
Poetry: The new world by Carolyn Nakagawa http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/06/poetry-the-new-world-by-carol-nakagawa/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/06/poetry-the-new-world-by-carol-nakagawa/#comments Sun, 07 Jun 2015 20:25:12 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10817 By: Carolyn Nakagawa

The new world

Dear summertime, I don’t know the Musqueam word for strawberry, or if there are buttercups in Japan. For me, you have always been that short July season of reddest, yielding flesh, and the fields … more »

]]>
By: Carolyn Nakagawa

The new world

Dear summertime, I don’t know the Musqueam word for strawberry, or if there are buttercups in Japan. For me, you have always been that short July season of reddest, yielding flesh, and the fields turned golden. There are so many things I would un-discover if I ever left home for good. I’m learning to sift through layers of history, grazing sediments of calculated heartlessness. Glittering glass shards that carve my perception. I didn’t know we were so broken. And still I can lie in the greenest grass and search for deep points of azure, never seeing the boats that carried my ancestors, that broke their backs with building, that sat in harbours, or any part of the ocean I grew up knowing about. If we put the prism back together, would it stay this bright? Could we thread it all through again, would we be happy to talk about purity. About words that hurt no one. Can we still have strawberries. Can I tell you about buttercups. What I call them.

 

CAROLYN NAKAGAWA is a yonsei Japanese Canadian poet and playwright, who recently graduated from UBC English literature with a minor in Asian Canadian and Asian Migra- tion Studies. Her poems have been published by QWERTY, The Maynard, and Echolocation; play production highlights include UBC Players Club, Brave New Play Rites, and a staged reading with Vancouver Asian Canadian Theatre’s MSG Lab.


This Asian Index was featured in issue 20.2

Keep up to date with newly released fiction, non-fiction, poetry, graphic novels, and children’s books. Subscribe to Ricepaper Magazine.

]]>
http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/06/poetry-the-new-world-by-carol-nakagawa/feed/ 0
The Asian Index: Star Wars http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/06/the-asian-index-star-wars/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/06/the-asian-index-star-wars/#comments Mon, 01 Jun 2015 23:55:43 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10802

Star Wars

The year George Lucas writes Star Wars: Rough Draft: 1974
The year the Chinese Canadian Writer’s Workshop forms to publish the Gum San Po: 1974

The year the first Star Wars film is released: 1977
The year of

more »]]>

Star Wars

The year George Lucas writes Star Wars: Rough Draft: 1974
The year the Chinese Canadian Writer’s Workshop forms to publish the Gum San Po: 1974

The year the first Star Wars film is released: 1977
The year of the first Powell Street Festival in Vancouver: 1977

The year the second Star Wars film, The Empire Strikes Back, is released: 1980
The year the Asian Canadian Writer’s Workshop published the Vancouver edition of Asianadian magazine: 1980

The year the third film of the Star Wars franchise, Return of the Jedi, is released: 1983 The year Penguin Books publishes Joy Kogawa’s novel Obasan: 1983


This Asian Index was featured in issue 20.2

Keep up to date with newly released fiction, non-fiction, poetry, graphic novels, and children’s books. Subscribe to Ricepaper Magazine. 

]]>
http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/06/the-asian-index-star-wars/feed/ 0
20.2 Summer Issue http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/06/20-2-summer-issue/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/06/20-2-summer-issue/#comments Mon, 01 Jun 2015 23:42:46 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10797 Grab a cocktail and lay on the beach with your Raybans and enjoy the latest issue — our summer issue of Ricepaper magazine.

Ricepaper 20.2 Summer issue

 

Profile of Suzanne Ma by Anna Ling Kaye, artist-to-artist profile of Holman Wang by Taylor Brown … more »

]]>
Grab a cocktail and lay on the beach with your Raybans and enjoy the latest issue — our summer issue of Ricepaper magazine.

Ricepaper 20.2 Summer issue

 

Profile of Suzanne Ma by Anna Ling Kaye, artist-to-artist profile of Holman Wang by Taylor Brown Evans, Fiction from Alan Bao, Jonathan Chan Simpson, Nadia Siu Van, Poetry from Tim Mook Sang, Carolyn Nakagawa, Anna Yin, Creative non-fiction from Fiona Tinwei La, Issac Yuen, Graphica from Jessica Tremblay, Dmitry Borshch and Book reviews of Subway Stations of the Cross by Ins Choi and Illustrations by Guno Park, The Vegetarian by Han Kang, Belonging: The Paradox of Citizenship by Adrienne Clarkson, Let the Elephants Run by David Usher.

Purchase our print publications here.
Our digital archive is online

]]>
http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/06/20-2-summer-issue/feed/ 0
Doretta Lau: The Official Judge of Ricepaper’s Flash Fiction Contest http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/05/doretta-lau-the-official-judge-of-ricepapers-flash-fiction-contest/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/05/doretta-lau-the-official-judge-of-ricepapers-flash-fiction-contest/#comments Fri, 08 May 2015 17:15:30 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10772 We are happy to announce that Doretta Lau, finalist for the Writers’ Trust of Canada / McClelland & Stewart Journey Prize and author of How Does a Single Blade of Grass Thank the Sun?, will be the official judge … more »

]]>
We are happy to announce that Doretta Lau, finalist for the Writers’ Trust of Canada / McClelland & Stewart Journey Prize and author of How Does a Single Blade of Grass Thank the Sun?, will be the official judge of Ricepaper’s First Annual Secret Ingredient Flash Fiction Contest.

Doretta Lau

Doretta has been a good friend and contributor to Ricepaper magazine. Check out her short story Days of Being Wild in Ricepaper issue 18.3.

Contest details: Ricepaper’s Annual Secret Ingredient Fiction Contest is a 500-words-max flash fiction contest. The piece of work must include the mystery ingredient “Ramen” selected by Ricepaper’s editorial staff.

Deadline: July 1, 2015

Entry fee: $25 and 1-year subscription. If you are already a subscriber, you can gift your contest subscription forward, or extend by a year. (+$6 for additional entry)

Submit to: Submittable.

Prize: FIRST PLACE: $250, publication in issue 20.4 winter 2015, online publication, contest winner announcement at and free registration for the 2015 literAsian Festival.*

*Travel and lodging costs not included.

]]>
http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/05/doretta-lau-the-official-judge-of-ricepapers-flash-fiction-contest/feed/ 0
Ricepaper Magazine Issue 20.1 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/ricepaper-magazine-issue-20-1/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/ricepaper-magazine-issue-20-1/#comments Tue, 24 Mar 2015 03:21:59 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10738 Spring is here and so is Ricepaper’s latest issue. We are celebrating our 20th volume by sharing our love for all our readers, friends, and community members. In this issue, you’ll find a delightful variety of prose, poetry, and graphica … more »

]]>
Spring is here and so is Ricepaper’s latest issue. We are celebrating our 20th volume by sharing our love for all our readers, friends, and community members. In this issue, you’ll find a delightful variety of prose, poetry, and graphica focusing on the topic of love. Naoko Kumagai’s Koshien delves into the world of baseball and passion, while Aaron Chan’s Cold War deals with the complications of same sex relationships. Also, issue 20.1 features poetry from Elaine Woo, Evelyn Lau, Jenny Heijum Wills, Leanne Dunic, and Changming Yuan. Ricepaper Magazine’s spring issue includes a profile of Canada Reads winner Kim Thúy by Elliot Chan and a graphic profile of illustrator Michael Cho by Taylor Brown-Evans.

11041791_10153119460632250_1584303479319512110_n

 

Buy your copy today.

Or better off, subscribe!

 

]]>
http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/ricepaper-magazine-issue-20-1/feed/ 0
Call for Submissions: Roots Issue (20.3-Fall 2015) http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/call-for-submissions-roots-issue-20-3-fall-2015/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/call-for-submissions-roots-issue-20-3-fall-2015/#comments Wed, 18 Mar 2015 04:08:58 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10724 What are your roots?

In partnership with the Pacific Canada Heritage Centre – Museum of Migration Society, Ricepaper Magazine is creating a special issue devoted to the concept of roots, to be published Fall 2015. Canada is a country with … more »

]]>
What are your roots?

In partnership with the Pacific Canada Heritage Centre – Museum of Migration Society, Ricepaper Magazine is creating a special issue devoted to the concept of roots, to be published Fall 2015. Canada is a country with roots that extend over the Pacific ocean as well as throughout the country, and we are looking for stories by those who wish to explore the stories behind these roots. Subjects can include immigrant stories, identity transformation upon crossing cultural and geographical boundaries, tracing roots/being uprooted/putting down new roots, having new adventures in different countries, inter-generational negotiation and reconciliation, etc. Be creative! Please include a brief biographical note of approximately fifty (50) words along with your submission.

We are looking for short stories, creative non-fiction, poetry, drama excerpts, and manga/comics with themes pertinent to roots or migration stories. We accept writing from authors of all cultural backgrounds, however, the focus of the issue concentrates on roots from across the Pacific, including East Asian, Southeast Asian, and South Asian writers.

Fiction, creative non-fiction, drama and graphic novel excerpts should be approximately 6,000 words in length, and no more than 2 pieces per submission,

Poetry submissions can contain up to 7 poems,

Submit online at Submittable.

Hard copies can be mailed to

Ricepaper magazine
PO Box 74174 Hillcrest RPO
Vancouver, BC
V5V 5C8

 

Please note that Ricepaper makes acceptances on a rolling basis, therefore early submissions are highly encouraged.

]]>
http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/call-for-submissions-roots-issue-20-3-fall-2015/feed/ 0
10 Things to Remember when Visiting your Home Country http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/10-things-to-remember-when-visiting-your-home-country/ http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/10-things-to-remember-when-visiting-your-home-country/#comments Tue, 17 Mar 2015 18:30:58 +0000 http://ricepapermagazine.ca/?p=10712 I came to Canada four and a half years ago to study, a few months after my eighteenth birthday. It’s an age where my views of the world and my surroundings have yet to develop like it would in university. … more »

]]>
I came to Canada four and a half years ago to study, a few months after my eighteenth birthday. It’s an age where my views of the world and my surroundings have yet to develop like it would in university. You could say that I was, well, innocent. I was leaving the place where I grew up, so naturally I was going to miss it soon and often.

northern hemisphere of the globe

I visited my home country many times after coming to Canada. Returning home became a vacation, and no matter how costly, it’s one of the best vacations one can take and let me tell you — it’s worth it. Nevertheless, venturing back to a place that is completely different to where you are currently living, even if it was the place where you spent your childhood, can be overwhelming. Here are the things to do and remember when visiting your home country:

2093131011_384d765a21_z

  1. Plan ahead. Book your tickets at least two months before your departure date. Buses, trains, and airplanes are usually very busy during the holiday season, and you don’t want to miss out on tickets. If you’re traveling by air, I heard that the cheapest time to buy a plane ticket is 54 days before the flight.

  2. Keep in touch with news and trends at home. Living in another country doesn’t mean that you can be out of touch with what’s going on where your family and friends reside. I always found it beneficial to keep in touch with what’s new at home; somehow, it makes me feel more connected with my country, friends, and family. It’s also a way to let them know that you still care about where you come from.

  3. Ask your friends and family if they need anything from you abroad, and bring gifts. They don’t have to be anything big or expensive, but tokens of appreciations let your friends and family know that, despite the distance, they are still close to your heart.

  4. Spend at least three weeks at home. Give yourself a few days to rest at home after arriving, especially if it’s a long flight. Get use to the new timezone (if that’s an issue) so you could spend as much quality time as possible with your friends and family.note book with inspiration

  5. Make plans to meet with friends and family. After moving to Canada, I realized how much an effort relationships were; not just with your significant other, but with your friends and family as well. Make sure to plan your schedule so you could see everyone you want to meet in the short time that you’re home, but don’t forget to also prioritize and spend time with those who matter most.

  6. Brace yourself for hurtful or inappropriate comments from relatives. In Indonesia, it’s normal to comment on someone’s physical appearance after not seeing each other for a while. I had to hear a lot of “wow, you’re fat now” or “you became bloated somehow!” which was not easy anymore to hear; I became used to Canadian social norms and have forgotten mine. If this happens to you, take a deep breath and remember that your relatives show their love to you in their own cultural ways.

  7. Expect a culture shock in your own home country, remember that you might have changed since the last time you came home, and perhaps so did your friends and family. Your habits might have changed, or your perspectives on aspects of life did. Remember not to impose your new beliefs or habits, if you have any, on people at home, and respect those of your loved ones. Like traveling to countries you’ve never visited before, visiting your home country may also open your mind and introduce you to a new culture, while providing you with opportunities to grow to be a better person. Sure, there’s likely some disconnect between your life and those of your friends and family, but as long as you remain respectful, you’ll get through it wonderfully.

  8. Indulge in food and other things you can’t find abroad. Whenever I go home, I would go eat my favourite Indonesian street foods or my grandma’s cooking. I would also rejoice in the sunny, tropical weather! One of the best things about going back to your home country is, you’re taking a vacation in a familiar and loved place (well, if you do love it, that is!)

  9. Find and learn new things to love about your home country. It’s easy to focus on the negative aspects of my home country, especially since it is starkly different from Canada, where I have gotten so used to live in. Finding new things to love is more challenging, but also rewarding. You get to keep that connection with your own culture, heritage and tradition, and it may help you feel more connected with people at home, too.

  10. Tell your friends and family you love them. Never forget this point. Let them know that despite the distance between you all, you always hold them close to your heart.

If you follow all of the above steps, your visit at home will likely be more peaceful, relaxed and eventful. Traveling to other countries is fun, but traveling to your home country is a different happiness altogether!

]]>
http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2015/03/10-things-to-remember-when-visiting-your-home-country/feed/ 0